Course Information

Required First-Year Courses

The following courses totaling 31 semester hours are required.

  • LAWR515 Civil Procedure

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction, with emphasis on federal law, to rules governing jurisdiction, venue, service of process, pleadings, joinder, discovery, summary adjudication, trial, judgments, direct and collateral attack on judgments, appellate procedure, and choice of law in civil litigation.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWR503 Constitutional Law

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    An introduction to the law of the United States Constitution and to the legal dynamics of constitutional drafting and interpreting. Separation of powers, federalism, economic and social regulation, privileges, and immunities of U.S. citizenship, and the federal civil rights to equal protection and due process are examined from doctrinal and historical perspectives.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWR513 Contracts

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Basic elements of contract law. Stress on the agreement process, i.e., offer and acceptance, consideration, and substitutes for consideration. Avoidance of contractual obligations, conditions, performance, and breach of contracts are examined, as are discharge of contractual duties and remedies. Third-party beneficiaries, assignments, and illegal contracts may be examined. The Uniform Commercial Code and the Restatement are emphasized throughout.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWR506 Criminal Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Sources of criminal law; constitutional limitations on power to create and define crimes; elements of crimes; conduct, mental state, causation; specific offenses, including homicides, sex offenses, larceny and other property offenses; defenses of mistakes, infancy, compulsion, intoxication, insanity; attempt; solicitation; conspiracy; accessoryship.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWR517 Legal Analysis and Writing I
  • LAWR518 Legal Analysis and Writing II
  • LAWR520 Legal Research I
  • LAWR521 Legal Research II
  • LAWR519 Legislation and Regulation

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Legislation and Regulation provides an introduction to public lawmaking in the modern administrative state. It examines the way Congress and administrative agencies adopt binding rules of law (statutes and regulations, respectively) and the way implementing institutions--courts and administrative agencies--interpret and apply these laws. It considers, in particular, the justifications for modern regulation, the structure of the modern administrative state, the incentives that influence the behavior of the various actors, and the legal rules that help to structure the relationships among Congress, the agencies, and the courts.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWR516 Property

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction to property laws, with emphasis on the concepts of title and possession of personal and real property; finders and bailments; rights and remedies of the possessor; donative transactions; rights of the bona fide purchaser; historical background of real property law; estates in land; concurrent ownership; conveyancing and future interests after the Statute of Uses; Statute of Frauds; contracts, deeds, and mortgages in the sale of land; recordation and title examination; covenants, easements, and licenses in the use of land.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWR514 Torts

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Liability for personal injuries and injuries to property. Includes analysis of various intentional tort theories, the concepts of negligence and strict liability, and the privileges and defenses which may apply to actions brought in tort. May include treatment of one or more special or emerging areas such as product liability, misrepresentation, privacy, defamation, misuse of legal procedures, or interference with advantageous relationships.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

Required Upper-Level Courses

The following upper-level course is required in the fall after completing the first year.

  • LAWR598 Trial Advocacy

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Introduces second-year students to essential lawyering skills of trial and appellate advocacy.

Required Upper-Level Courses

One of the following upper-level courses is required:
  • LAWR605 Professional Responsibility

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Ethical standards of the legal profession, including judicial ethics and unauthorized practice.

  • LAWE734 Professional Responsibility: Criminal Practice

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Reviews some of the major ethical considerations that confront prosecutors and criminal defense attorneys, including ethical considerations surrounding the discovery process, ethical pleading principles, joint defense agreements, inadvertent disclosures, resolving disputes with clients regarding trial tactics, communicating with clients effectively, and setting and collecting fees. Students will examine these and similar questions by studying case opinions, selected secondary materials, and applicable ABA Model Rules of Professional responsibility, and by participating in weekly discussion.

  • LAWE724 Professional Responsibility: Family Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Delineates the ethical responsibilities of lawyers in family law cases. Issues related to the lawyer-client relationships: communication and confidentiality; conflicts of interests; controlling the case; ethical tactics; ethical negotiations; mediation; and other ethical duties of the family law practitioner are surveyed. Designed to encourage the study and elevate the standards of those who practice family law. There will be case studies and examples of issues that are presented to the practicing family lawyer on a day-to-day basis. The course will combine theory and practice as it relates to helping to guide the practicing lawyer through the maze of ethical issues that are constantly arising in the family law practice. This course is required for those students seeking the Certificate of Concentration in Family Law.

    Prerequisites

    Family Law (707).

  • LAWE714 Professional Responsibility: Role of the Prosecutor

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Examines how and why the prosecutor has become the most influential actor in today's criminal justice process. Debates the normative consequences of that development. Discusses a variety of topics of contemporary significance, including the scope of prosecutorial power, past and current attempts to constrain prosecutorial power, and how prosecutorial power shapes the criminal justice system as a whole. Examines the relationships between prosecutors and other institutions, such as legislatures, courts, defense attorneys, victims, and the public. The course will also include substantial instruction on the rules of professional conduct as they apply to prosecutors. Assessment based on participation in class and a series of short papers.

Writing in Practice Courses

One of the following upper-level courses is required:

  • LAWE786 Advanced Legal Analysis and Writing
  • LAWE748 Advanced Legal Research
  • LAWR599 Appellate Advocacy

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Introduces second-year students to essential lawyering skills of trial and appellate advocacy. Meets Lawyering Skills IV requirement and is strongly encouraged during the second year.

  • LAWE669 Art of the Argument

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Explores the rhetorical roots of argument, the "five types of argument" described by Wilson Huhn, and the psychology of persuasion. Students will read briefs from some important cases (often in the area of labor and employment law), conduct rhetorical critiques of those briefs, and develop the skills needed to craft persuasive arguments inside and outside the courtroom in written and verbal form. Students will write several short practice-oriented documents and a brief. Students will present a short speech and oral argument.

  • LAWE761 Business Litigation Practicum

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Litigation-oriented course focusing on analytical and drafting skills within the context of a complex corporate fraud case. Analysis of an actual corporate fraud lawsuit through the lens of various substantive and procedural rules, including pleading requirements, causation, damages, class certification, discovery, and settlement. Focuses on application of legal rules and legal strategy, rather than simply legal doctrine, although doctrines from the federal securities laws, state corporate law, civil procedure, federal jurisdiction, and other areas of the law will be discussed. Requirements also include drafting a complaint and motion to dismiss. Grading will be based on weekly drafting assignments, as well as the drafting of the complaint and motion to dismiss.

  • LAWE753 Children's Defense Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Students advocate on behalf of children appearing before area juvenile courts. In the majority of cases, students serve as defense counsel for youth accused of delinquency (criminal) offenses. Students are also occasionally assigned to work on other cases which involve children's issues such as abuse and neglect or custody.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration, and a course in Juvenile Justice is preferred. Contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE679 Contract Drafting

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    In this Law Skills IV pilot course, Application of contract law principles to the drafting of contracts through weekly written exercises, drafting assignments, and negotiations. Techniques to draft clear and accurate contracts and to effectively review contracts drafted by others. Several exercises will include ethical considerations in contract drafting. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

  • LAWE778 Family Law Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Working under the supervision of the clinic director, students will represent low-income clients in the City of Richmond on family law-related matters in a multi-disciplinary collaboration with faculty-supervised graduate students from Virginia Commonwealth University's School of Social Work and Department of Psychology.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE710 Intellectual Property Drafting

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Will focus on developing and refining practical skills, including conducting intellectual property audits, filing domestic and Madrid Protocol applications with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, trademark examination rules and procedures, conducting opposition proceedings, copyright filings, franchising issues, developing and implementing trade secrets policies and programs for businesses, licensing, and ethics.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 641.

  • LAWE782 Intellectual Property Litigation Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Exposure to intellectual property litigation practice through simulation. Skills will include interviewing and counseling client; recognizing causes of action, potential counter-claims, and defenses; figuring out jurisdiction and venue issues; preparing discovery; and drafting pre-trial motions. Grading will be based on writing assignments and class participation in simulation exercises. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 641 Intellectual Property Fundamentals or LAWE 744 Patent Law or LAWE 768 Trademark & Unfair Competition Law

  • LAWE790 Intellectual Property and Transactional Law Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Students represent for-profit and nonprofit organizations, as well as social entrepreneurs, artists, authors and inventors from a variety of backgrounds. Students will help business startup clients by engaging in business formation counseling. Students provide legal services to clients, including negotiating and drafting contracts, providing corporate legal services and analysis, and facilitating strategic decision-making. Students assist clients in the assessment and potential licensing of a variety of intellectual property rights. The classroom seminar will provide clinic students the opportunity to study and reflect on the theoretical framework and application of related substantive subjects.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE756 International Business Practice

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    A hands-on opportunity to develop strategies for Virginia companies seeking to expand their businesses in foreign markets. Students meet with a Virginia business client to define the scope of their project, identify legal issues, research foreign and domestic laws, develop legal strategies, and then present their findings to the client¿s executives and senior management. Law students team with MBA students from a participating business school to prepare international business plans and then co-present their work to the client. The teams prepare and deliver comprehensive presentations of their strategies and the legal issues they have identified as the capstone to their work.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE601 Pre-Trial Litigation Skills

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Enhances understanding of critical pretrial tools and provides practical experience with using these tools. Course requires drafting a variety of pretrial documents that are frequently used in litigation, such as a complaint, and a pretrial motion. Also provides practice of such skills as interviewing clients and negotiating settlements. Focuses on the correct use of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure but relevant in state court litigation as well.

  • LAWE639 Public Policy Research and Drafting

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Combines both advanced legal research and writing instruction with a client-based experience. Provides students with an opportunity to explore advanced legal research in the public policy field, develop their writing skills in the context of creating an issue paper, and engage in client relations with nonprofit organizations from the greater Richmond community.

  • LAWE660 Regulatory Law Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Practice-oriented exposure to regulatory law and to legal careers working within and against government agencies. Assignments include client counseling, negotiating against the government, multi-stakeholder policy planning, writing and enforcing regulations, complaint drafting, and litigation settlement. Interactive class sessions will be devoted to problems drawn from environmental law, health, financial reform, and other areas. Grading will be based on writing assignments and in-class presentations. There is no final exam. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

  • LAWE684 Start-up Accelerator Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction to working with startup companies and entrepreneurs on issues of corporate governance and early-stage venture capital investments. Students will work with real companies at Lighthouse Labs, a start-up accelerator located in downtown Richmond. Students will work with the instructor to provide services like drafting operating agreements, term sheets, and documents relating to private equity investments. Also covers drafting and amending capitalization tables, calculating payments to owners and investors, and advising clients on the economic and practical implications of these transactions.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 602

  • LAWE711 Workers Compensation

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    A practical survey of workers' compensation in Virginia. Focuses on providing a substantive overview of the law, combined with projects geared toward teaching students to handle actual workers' compensation cases, from the investigation and filing of a claim through hearing and appeal.

Upper-Level Writing Requirement (ULWR)

During either the second or third year of law school, each J.D. student must satisfactorily complete a substantial paper requiring in-depth research of a specific area of law. The paper must evidence a sophisticated knowledge of the law and provide a rigorous, thoughtful analysis of an unsettled area of the law, issue of first impression, or other legal topic requiring substantial original thinking. A paper meeting this requirement will be at least 5,000 words in length, not including citations. Any paper approved by the professor may satisfy this requirement, as long as above criteria are met, but examples of a qualifying paper include:
  1. A scholarly paper.
  2. An appellate brief (including an amicus brief).
  3. A policy memorandum.

The paper must be written as part of a course or independent study of at least two credits, designated as ULWR, and the paper must constitute a major part of the assessment in course. In addition, faculty must require certain input measures of student performance, including:

  1. Predrafting requirements (e.g., topic proposal and detailed outline).
  2. At least one full draft, on which the professor provides individualized feedback (e.g., one-on-one conferences, extensive written comments, etc.) that addresses both student writing and analysis.
  3. A final draft.
  • LAWE786 Advanced Legal Analysis and Writing
  • LAWE748 Advanced Legal Research
  • LAWR599 Appellate Advocacy

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Introduces second-year students to essential lawyering skills of trial and appellate advocacy. Meets Lawyering Skills IV requirement and is strongly encouraged during the second year.

  • LAWE669 Art of the Argument

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Explores the rhetorical roots of argument, the "five types of argument" described by Wilson Huhn, and the psychology of persuasion. Students will read briefs from some important cases (often in the area of labor and employment law), conduct rhetorical critiques of those briefs, and develop the skills needed to craft persuasive arguments inside and outside the courtroom in written and verbal form. Students will write several short practice-oriented documents and a brief. Students will present a short speech and oral argument.

  • LAWE761 Business Litigation Practicum

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Litigation-oriented course focusing on analytical and drafting skills within the context of a complex corporate fraud case. Analysis of an actual corporate fraud lawsuit through the lens of various substantive and procedural rules, including pleading requirements, causation, damages, class certification, discovery, and settlement. Focuses on application of legal rules and legal strategy, rather than simply legal doctrine, although doctrines from the federal securities laws, state corporate law, civil procedure, federal jurisdiction, and other areas of the law will be discussed. Requirements also include drafting a complaint and motion to dismiss. Grading will be based on weekly drafting assignments, as well as the drafting of the complaint and motion to dismiss.

  • LAWE753 Children's Defense Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Students advocate on behalf of children appearing before area juvenile courts. In the majority of cases, students serve as defense counsel for youth accused of delinquency (criminal) offenses. Students are also occasionally assigned to work on other cases which involve children's issues such as abuse and neglect or custody.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration, and a course in Juvenile Justice is preferred. Contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE679 Contract Drafting

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    In this Law Skills IV pilot course, Application of contract law principles to the drafting of contracts through weekly written exercises, drafting assignments, and negotiations. Techniques to draft clear and accurate contracts and to effectively review contracts drafted by others. Several exercises will include ethical considerations in contract drafting. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

  • LAWE778 Family Law Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Working under the supervision of the clinic director, students will represent low-income clients in the City of Richmond on family law-related matters in a multi-disciplinary collaboration with faculty-supervised graduate students from Virginia Commonwealth University's School of Social Work and Department of Psychology.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE710 Intellectual Property Drafting

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Will focus on developing and refining practical skills, including conducting intellectual property audits, filing domestic and Madrid Protocol applications with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, trademark examination rules and procedures, conducting opposition proceedings, copyright filings, franchising issues, developing and implementing trade secrets policies and programs for businesses, licensing, and ethics.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 641.

  • LAWE782 Intellectual Property Litigation Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Exposure to intellectual property litigation practice through simulation. Skills will include interviewing and counseling client; recognizing causes of action, potential counter-claims, and defenses; figuring out jurisdiction and venue issues; preparing discovery; and drafting pre-trial motions. Grading will be based on writing assignments and class participation in simulation exercises. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 641 Intellectual Property Fundamentals or LAWE 744 Patent Law or LAWE 768 Trademark & Unfair Competition Law

  • LAWE790 Intellectual Property and Transactional Law Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Students represent for-profit and nonprofit organizations, as well as social entrepreneurs, artists, authors and inventors from a variety of backgrounds. Students will help business startup clients by engaging in business formation counseling. Students provide legal services to clients, including negotiating and drafting contracts, providing corporate legal services and analysis, and facilitating strategic decision-making. Students assist clients in the assessment and potential licensing of a variety of intellectual property rights. The classroom seminar will provide clinic students the opportunity to study and reflect on the theoretical framework and application of related substantive subjects.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE756 International Business Practice

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    A hands-on opportunity to develop strategies for Virginia companies seeking to expand their businesses in foreign markets. Students meet with a Virginia business client to define the scope of their project, identify legal issues, research foreign and domestic laws, develop legal strategies, and then present their findings to the client¿s executives and senior management. Law students team with MBA students from a participating business school to prepare international business plans and then co-present their work to the client. The teams prepare and deliver comprehensive presentations of their strategies and the legal issues they have identified as the capstone to their work.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE601 Pre-Trial Litigation Skills

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Enhances understanding of critical pretrial tools and provides practical experience with using these tools. Course requires drafting a variety of pretrial documents that are frequently used in litigation, such as a complaint, and a pretrial motion. Also provides practice of such skills as interviewing clients and negotiating settlements. Focuses on the correct use of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure but relevant in state court litigation as well.

  • LAWE639 Public Policy Research and Drafting

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Combines both advanced legal research and writing instruction with a client-based experience. Provides students with an opportunity to explore advanced legal research in the public policy field, develop their writing skills in the context of creating an issue paper, and engage in client relations with nonprofit organizations from the greater Richmond community.

  • LAWE660 Regulatory Law Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Practice-oriented exposure to regulatory law and to legal careers working within and against government agencies. Assignments include client counseling, negotiating against the government, multi-stakeholder policy planning, writing and enforcing regulations, complaint drafting, and litigation settlement. Interactive class sessions will be devoted to problems drawn from environmental law, health, financial reform, and other areas. Grading will be based on writing assignments and in-class presentations. There is no final exam. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

  • LAWE684 Start-up Accelerator Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction to working with startup companies and entrepreneurs on issues of corporate governance and early-stage venture capital investments. Students will work with real companies at Lighthouse Labs, a start-up accelerator located in downtown Richmond. Students will work with the instructor to provide services like drafting operating agreements, term sheets, and documents relating to private equity investments. Also covers drafting and amending capitalization tables, calculating payments to owners and investors, and advising clients on the economic and practical implications of these transactions.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 602

  • LAWE711 Workers Compensation

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    A practical survey of workers' compensation in Virginia. Focuses on providing a substantive overview of the law, combined with projects geared toward teaching students to handle actual workers' compensation cases, from the investigation and filing of a claim through hearing and appeal.

Second- or Third-Year Elective Courses

Note: A course in professional responsibility and the elective course Evidence must be satisfactorily completed by the end of the second year if the student wishes to qualify to appear in a Virginia court as a third-year student under the Third-Year Practice Rule. Students may obtain a Third-year Practice certificate after they have completed 56 credits, plus courses in Civil Procedure, Criminal Law, Evidence, and Professional Responsibility. This certificate allows a student to appear in some courts under the supervision of a licensed attorney.

  • LAWE607 Administrative Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    The common process by which the law produced by government agencies is produced and challenged. Study of the constitutional limits on bureaucratic power and structure and examination the most important sections of federal and state statutes that impose uniform procedures for the promulgation of regulations and the decision of cases before administrative tribunals. Specific examples from the work of agencies such as environmental protection agencies, industrial and professional licensing boards, labor relations boards, workers' compensation tribunals, and schools. Includes federal and state law. For their grades, students are invited to take a final examination or to produce case notes suitable for law review publication.

  • LAWE608 Admiralty Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Overview for those anticipating the practice of law where boating and shipping are prevalent. Includes topics related to civil procedure and federal courts: jurisdiction, attachment, and immunities; surveys issues of contracts and commercial law: liability between shippers and carriers, insurance, collision, and salvage; personal injury, wrongful death, and maritime employment. Assessment on the basis of a final examination, a term paper, or a Supreme Court brief for the Judge John R. Brown Admiralty Moot Court Competition. Meets upper-level writing requirement for students who write the term paper.

  • LAWE776 Advanced Clinical Practice: Children

    Semester hours: 1-6

    Units:

    Description

    With faculty permission, students who have completed a clinical experience in Children's Defense may enroll for advanced clinical work in the same field for between two and six credits. Advanced students will take leadership roles in clinic matters and complete a significant project over the course of the semester.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 753

  • LAWE777 Advanced Clinical Practice: Family Law

    Semester hours: 2-6

    Units:

    Description

    With faculty permission, students who have completed a clinical experience in Family Law may enroll for advanced clinical work in the same field for between two and six credits. Advanced students will take leadership roles in clinic matters and complete a significant project over the course of the semester.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 778

  • LAWE772 Advanced Clinical Practice: Intellectual Property

    Semester hours: 2-6

    Units:

    Description

    With faculty permission, students who have completed a clinical experience in Intellectual Property may enroll for advanced clinical work in the same field for between two and six credits. Advanced students will take leadership roles in clinic matters and complete a significant project over the course of the semester.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 790

  • LAWE775 Advanced Clinical Practice: Wrongful Conviction

    Semester hours: 1-6

    Units:

    Description

    With faculty permission, students who have completed a clinical experience in Wrongful Convictions may enroll for advanced clinical work in the same field for between two and six credits. Advanced students will take leadership roles in clinic matters and complete a significant project over the course of the semester.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 774

  • LAWE720 Advanced Energy Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    In-depth law and policy research and development in energy law, with specific emphasis on public policy formation and interactions with regulated entities and the public. Research papers, rule comments, a white paper, policy recommendations, draft legislation, revised organization procedures, or other similar policy outcomes, with potential affiliations with, and work on behalf of, energy nonprofit organizations or government agencies.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 666

  • LAWE648 Advanced International Law

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

    Description

    Builds on the foundation acquired in the International Law course by examining specific issues and sub-fields of international law including how the international legal system works and power relations among international actors. Examples of specific issues include Law of the Sea (the regime of islands, definitions of territorial sea, exclusive economic zones, and continental shelf) and elements of international economic law, such as trade and investment law. Meets Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 643 International Law or permission of instructor.

  • LAWE786 Advanced Legal Analysis and Writing
  • LAWE748 Advanced Legal Research
  • LAWE632 Advanced Trial Advocacy

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Refines and builds on the skills covered in Trial Practice or Lawyering Skills by using more complex civil and criminal problems and files developed by the National Institute for Trial Advocacy for training the more experienced trial advocate. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of a case theory and the choosing of an appropriate case theme for the more complex case. Covers use of demonstrative evidence, including photographs, charts, white boards, overheads, videos, and computer simulations. Enrollment limited. While both civil and criminal problems will be used in the class, special emphasis is placed upon civil litigation and trying a complex civil case.

    Prerequisites

    Lawyering Skills III (598).

  • LAWE612 Agency and Partnership

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Creation of agency relationships; contractual liability of principals (disclosed and undisclosed), agents and third parties; tort liability of principals; fiduciary duties of agents; partnership: creation, rights, and duties of partners, dissolution of partnerships; limited partnerships; limited liability companies (LLCs).

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE766 Aging and Disability Law Practicum

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Examines discrimination, entitlements, ethical issues and comparative law related to the elderly and the disabled. The Practicum, an integrated teaching, research, and community service program, provides health and elder rights representation to underserved communities in cooperation with a medical-legal partnership with the VCU Health System. Topics include legal issues relating to such matters as capacity, guardianship, powers of attorney, Medicare, Medicaid (Medical Assistance), the protective services system, tax law as it applies to the elderly and disabled population, questions relating to options for long term care, and the practical aspects of providing legal services to the elderly and disabled population.

  • LAWE610 Alternative Dispute Resolution

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    An exploration of the process of mediation as an alternative to litigation. Topics will include mediation history and theory, general conflict resolution techniques, specific mediation techniques, including identifying interests, reframing, building successes, dealing with emotions, caucusing, brainstorming, evaluating options and consequences, and reality testing. Skills in theses techniques will be developed through role-play. Other topics will include the role of mediators in drafting agreements, forms of agreements and mediator ethics. In addition, the role of attorneys as advocates and advocacy techniques will be covered. Limited to sixteen students.

  • LAWE732 American Legal Culture for International Lawyers
  • LAWE727 American Legal Rhetoric and Writing
  • LAWE709 Animal Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Exploration of this emerging field of law with an emphasis on the latest cases, legislation and legal theory behind it. Areas of study include anti-cruelty; dogfighting; cockfighting; standing; wills and trusts benefitting animals; factory farming; The Endangered Species Act; non-economic damages for harm done to companion animals; and litigation over the treatment and welfare of animals. Classes will incorporate real world contributions from many of those people directly affected by animal law, including veterinarians, prosecutors, activists and lawyers.

  • LAWE699-K Anti-Bribery Law in International Business

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Special Topic. Explores various dimensions of international anti-corruption law, including but not limited to bribery, money laundering, tax evasion, and banking secrecy. Satisfies upper level writing requirement. Students pick a paper topic early in the semester and dedicate most of their time to preparing the paper and an oral presentation.

  • LAWE613 Antitrust

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Control of private economic power in the United States, focusing on the law regarding monopolies, mergers, and restrictive business practices as regulated by the Sherman and Clayton acts. Some attention to other federal antitrust legislation such as the Federal Trade Commission Act and state antitrust enforcement.

  • LAWE669 Art of the Argument

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Explores the rhetorical roots of argument, the "five types of argument" described by Wilson Huhn, and the psychology of persuasion. Students will read briefs from some important cases (often in the area of labor and employment law), conduct rhetorical critiques of those briefs, and develop the skills needed to craft persuasive arguments inside and outside the courtroom in written and verbal form. Students will write several short practice-oriented documents and a brief. Students will present a short speech and oral argument.

  • LAWE704 Bankruptcy and Corporate Reorganization

    Semester hours: 3 or 4

    Units:

    Description

    Explores what happens when a business or consumer defaults on debts. While most of the classes will deal with the Bankruptcy Code, we will also cover Virginia creditors rights law.

  • LAWE717 Bioethics

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Explores ethical and legal issues in healthcare. Among topics to be considered: distinctions, if any, between ethical and legal issues; philosophical models for analyzing bioethical issues, including deontological models (rules and rights), teleological models (utilitarian, economic), and principlism; informed consent and the autonomy versus utility debate; genetic engineering; organ transplantation; termination of life support; quality-of-life issues; beginning care and infants; cost issues, including how much to treat; and the cost of technology versus other societal values.

  • LAWE602 Business Associations

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Focuses on the law governing corporations, as well as the law of agency, partnerships, and limited liability companies. Discussion will include the choice of business form, distribution of power between managers and owners, fiduciary duties of managers, shareholder voting, and the special problems of close corporations.

  • LAWE761 Business Litigation Practicum

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Litigation-oriented course focusing on analytical and drafting skills within the context of a complex corporate fraud case. Analysis of an actual corporate fraud lawsuit through the lens of various substantive and procedural rules, including pleading requirements, causation, damages, class certification, discovery, and settlement. Focuses on application of legal rules and legal strategy, rather than simply legal doctrine, although doctrines from the federal securities laws, state corporate law, civil procedure, federal jurisdiction, and other areas of the law will be discussed. Requirements also include drafting a complaint and motion to dismiss. Grading will be based on weekly drafting assignments, as well as the drafting of the complaint and motion to dismiss.

  • LAWE736 Capital Murder Litigation

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Important issues arising in the trial of death penalty cases, including constitutional and statutory challenges, punishable offenses, mitigation, and jury selection.

  • LAWE616 Children and the Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Analysis of the legal relationships among children, families, and the state. Focus on how the law balances the rights and interests of children, their parents and caregivers, and the state under both the federal constitution and state law. Topics include the status, rights, and obligations of parents and children, and abuse and neglect of children, including the termination of parental rights. We will consider important and complex questions, for example, the appropriate balance between family autonomy and state regulation, and the effects of race, class, and gender on the legal rules in this area.

  • LAWE753 Children's Defense Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Students advocate on behalf of children appearing before area juvenile courts. In the majority of cases, students serve as defense counsel for youth accused of delinquency (criminal) offenses. Students are also occasionally assigned to work on other cases which involve children's issues such as abuse and neglect or custody.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration, and a course in Juvenile Justice is preferred. Contact the professor for details.

  • CLAC606 Chinese: Cultures and Language Across the Curriculum

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic Chinese materials relevant to materials in the primary course. Pass/fail grade only.

  • LAWE631 Civil Litigation

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Provides knowledge necessary to litigate an ordinary civil lawsuit. Procedural requirements and topics in civil cases including: remedies, choice of law, insurance considerations, statutes of limitations, certain rules of evidence, enforcement of judgments, and appellate review. Focuses on blackletter law and strategic considerations; does not focus on policy or unsettled law. Graded work consists of regular assignments that are graded on a pass/fail basis.

  • LAWE686 Civil Rights Litigation

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    If a cop frisks you when he shouldn't, can you collect damages from him? If a public school requires prayer before every class, what can you do stop the constitutional violation? If you call 911 and the dispatcher fails to dispatch an officer, have your rights been violated? These and many other questions are addressed in this class, the ultimate goal of which is to provide students with the knowledge necessary to enforce constitutional rights through litigation. Includes (1) several commonly-litigated constitutional rights (such as abuse by a police or corrections officer), (2) the types of defendants that can be sued, (3) the common defenses, and (4) the nature and scope of the available remedies. Also provides the opportunity to assess the underlying causes of official misconduct, the limits of litigation as a civil rights enforcement tool, and whether alternate means of enforcement might be preferable.

  • LAWE699-RR Civil and Criminal Litigation Research

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Focuses on finding the documents generated by litigation, including records & briefs on appeal, dockets, discovery requests, and jury instructions. Practice drafting these documents using forms and model instructions.

  • LAWE750 Clinical Placement Program: Civil

    Semester hours: 5-7

    Units:

    Description

    Placements are available with non profit lawyers as well as local, state, and federal government lawyers working on civil law matters. Opportunities are offered in the areas of litigation, public policy, legislative advocacy, and regulatory law. Two-hour classroom component required. Graded pass/fail. See director of Clinical Placement Program for more details.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE751 Clinical Placement Program: Criminal

    Semester hours: 5-7

    Units:

    Description

    Placements with state and federal prosecutors and public defenders. Students must have completed the requirements for third year practice certification for all placements. Two-hour classroom component required. Graded pass/fail. See director of Clinical Placement Program for more details.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE746 Clinical Placement Program: In-House

    Semester hours: 5-7

    Units:

    Description

    Students placed with national and international corporations. Focuses on topics related to the role of in-house counsel, substantive issues related to the work of in-house counsel, and professionalism issues.

  • LAWE752 Clinical Placement Program: Judicial

    Semester hours: 5-7

    Units:

    Description

    Placements are offered in the chambers of both state and federal judges. Students assume the role of a law clerk. Opportunities are available at both the trial and appellate levels. Two-hour classroom component required. Graded pass/fail. See director of Clinical Placement Program for more details.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE749 Clinical Placement Program: Litigation

    Semester hours: 5-7

    Units:

    Description

    Placements that primarily involve litigation. The course focuses on the litigation process, trial techniques, and professionalism.

  • LAWE723 Collaborative Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Provides history and development of the collaborative practice model. Will discuss principles of collaborative practice and its different steps, the legal implications of required and recommended practice, and the difference between interest-based and positional negotiation strategies. In addition, students will practice skills necessary for effective collaborative practice. Will also explore ethical issues involved.

  • LAWE618 Commercial Paper and Payment Systems

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Law relating to negotiable instruments, bank deposits and collections, and electronic money transfers, with emphasis on Articles 3, 4, and 4A of the Uniform Commercial Code, the Expedited Funds Availability Act, and Regulation CC.

  • LAWE699-GG Commercial Transactions and Emerging Technology

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Exposes students to new technologies and help students to understand how they may impact existing laws. Reviews the work of the joint committee, continues exploring issues raised, and practices acting like a legislative committee tasked with developing solutions to anticipated problems.

  • LAWE699-UU Communication Design for Lawyers

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Blends the disciplines and skills of UX (user experience), visual design (graphical, layout, and typography), plain language, and digital interaction in practice on a selection of traditional contracts, preserving their legal integrity while improving their human-readability.

  • LAWE694 Comparative Public Law of the U.S. and U.K.

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    (Offered only in the Cambridge University Program.) Examines and compares underlying principles of constitutional and administrative law in the U.S. and the U.K.

  • LAWE621 Conflict of Laws

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Explores the law which applies to parties and transactions involving two or more states, or two or more nations. Emphasis on the variety of choice of law methodologies employed by American courts, including both traditional and modern approaches to choice of law. Also addresses such other issues raised by interstate and international transactions as recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments, long-arm jurisdiction, and constitutional limitations on choice of law decisions. Throughout the course, an attempt will be made to offer a comparative look at the way judicial systems of other nations deal with these issues. Assessment: The grade in this course will be based on one final examination, as well as class participation.

  • LAWE699-F Constitutional History

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Upper Level Writing Requirement.

    Description

    Special Topic. Examines the Constitutional Convention of 1787, ratification of the Constitution by state conventions, and adoption of the Bill of Rights.

  • LAWE650 Constitutional Jurisprudence

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Systematic examination of the jurisprudential underpinnings of the Constitution and of constitutional law. Topics include the nature of positive law, constitutional originalism, common-law constitutionalism, normative theories of constitutional law, and general jurisprudence.

  • LAWE651 Constitutional Law II: Individual Rights

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    An exploration of individual rights in the federal constitution, covering the speech, press, and free exercise rights in the First Amendment, the right to keep and bear arms in the Second Amendment, and the rights of equal protection and due process in the Fourteenth Amendment.

  • LAWE617 Construction Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Issues peculiar to construction projects from the perspective of the various participants, including developer, contractor, architect and lender and on dispute avoidance and resolution techniques. Includes negotiation and drafting of construction-related contracts.

  • LAWE679 Contract Drafting

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    In this Law Skills IV pilot course, Application of contract law principles to the drafting of contracts through weekly written exercises, drafting assignments, and negotiations. Techniques to draft clear and accurate contracts and to effectively review contracts drafted by others. Several exercises will include ethical considerations in contract drafting. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

  • LAWE699-U Coporate and Business Law Research

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Focuses on the legal and non-legal sources used by corporate lawyers, including SEC filings, corporate annual reports, IPOs, and other company information. Practice conducting due diligence in anticipation of a corporate merger.

  • LAWE788 Copyright Law
  • LAWE619 Core Commercial Law Concepts

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Explores the core concepts involved in (1) sales and leases of goods,(2) notes, checks, and electronic forms of payment, (3) credit transactions involving letters of credit and (4) credit transactions involving collateral other than real property. Emphasize principles rather than specific rules.

  • LAWE624 Core Legal Concepts
  • LAWE726 Corporate Compliance

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    A rapidly growing and promising practice area, corporate compliance involves the design, implementation, and monitoring of corporate policies and procedures for reducing the risk of violations within a company. Studies the role of compliance officers within the corporate structure and examines a sampling of federal laws that create especially acute compliance challenges, such as anti-corruption, environmental, health care, and employment law. Students will interact with practicing lawyers and compliance professionals to help understand a company's compliance challenges in practical terms.

  • LAWE689 Corporate Finance

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Topics covered include an analysis of corporate financial statements; security pricing; and other investment topics. No preliminary ability in finance is assumed and basic skills such as the time value of money are introduced

  • LAWE721 Corporate Governance

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Advanced corporate law seminar for students who have already taken Business Associations. Provides opportunity for in-depth discussion of current topics in the governance of widely-held U.S. firms. Topics include corporate social responsibility, controlling shareholders, institutional investors, shareholder activism, proxy advisors, the role of the board of directors, board composition and structures, shareholder litigation, executive compensation, corporate criminal liability, and comparative corporate governance.

    Prerequisites

    Business Associations (602)

  • LAWE623 Corporate Taxation

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction to the taxation of corporations and their shareholders, from formation of the corporation to liquidation. Builds on knowledge and skills acquired in the Federal Income Taxation course by examining the tax consequences of corporate events such as formation, capital contributions, distributions, redemptions, stock dividends, and liquidations. In addition, considers substance versus form questions in structuring corporate transactions, choice of business entity issues, the debt/equity distinction, tax shelters, and Congressional and administrative responses to taxpayer behavior. Class discussion focuses on problems designed to develop and test step-by-step understanding of corporate tax fundamentals. There is an examination at the end of the course.

    Prerequisites

    Federal Income Taxation (LAWE600)

  • LAWE737 Corruption in International Sports II

    Semester hours: 2-4

    Units:

    Description

    Addresses several salient international anti-corruption issues, including bribery, money laundering, bank secrecy, tax evasion, etc. Students will choose a paper topic early in the semester and devote the bulk of the semester to their topic.

  • LAWE731 Corruption in International Sports

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Uses an ongoing an international sports competition to addresses several salient international anti-corruption issues, including bribery, money laundering, bank secrecy, tax evasion, etc.

  • LAWE604 Criminal Client Relationship

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Designed to educate the student as to the importance of developing positive client relationships in order to fulfill their responsibilities as attorneys and counselors at law. Importance and methods of developing positive relationships with clients will be taught through a combination of lecture, demonstration, small group discussions of hypothetical situations, and participation in mock client interviews. Lectures will include ethical considerations as well as the requirements of the Standards of Practice for Indigent Defense Representation with respect to client communications and relationships. Special attention will be given to the challenges presented by clients with mental health issues and juvenile criminal defendants. The importance of developing and utilizing good interpersonal communication skills, both verbal and non-verbal, will be highlighted.

  • LAWE605 Criminal Law and Psychiatry

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Explores the intersections between criminal law and psychiatry/psychology. Discusses psychiatric diagnoses and the roles of mental health professionals within the criminal justice system, including "evaluator" and "expert." Topics include competency to stand trial, the insanity defense, false confessions, mental health and drug courts, and sex offenses and offenders.

  • LAWE625 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Federal and Virginia procedures at various stages of a criminal prosecution, including bail, preliminary hearings, indictments, discovery, speedy trial, double jeopardy, plea bargaining, jury selection, venue, and jurisdiction.

  • LAWE603 Criminal Procedure: Investigation

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Examines constitutional law in the criminal context, focusing on the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments. Topics explored include the selective incorporation doctrine, the exclusionary rule, the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable searches and seizures, the Sixth Amendment right to counsel, and the Fifth and Sixth Amendment's application in the area of confessions and interrogation.

  • LAWE783 Criminal Trial Advocacy

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Departmental approval.

    Description

    Advanced trial techniques and evidentiary issues for criminal practice. Weekly topics include developing a theme and theory for a criminal case, motions, opening statements, direct and cross examinations, foundations for admitting evidence, closing arguments, and evidentiary objections/arguments. Students are expected to prepare and to perform designated trial skills weekly. The classroom components culminate in a final trial at the end of the semester. Three to six members of the class will be competitively selected to compete in the John L. Costello National Criminal Law Trial Advocacy Competition in the spring, for which they will receive one additional pass/fail credit. Enrollment in the class is by application only.

  • LAWE754 Crimmigration

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Addresses the legal and policy issues that arise at the intersection of immigration law, criminal law, and criminal procedure. Explores how individuals perceived to have violated a criminal offense are treated in the immigration law system, how individuals thought not to be citizens of the United States are uniquely affected by criminal procedure norms and substantive criminal law, and how states and the federal government have sought to police criminal activity by noncitizens. Analysis of constitutional, statutory, and regulatory provisions concerning immigration and the procedural and substantive requirements concerning criminal proceedings as they affect noncitizens.

  • LAWE699-W Critical Theory Workshop

    Semester hours: 0-1

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Survey and exploration of Critical Theory, with a primary focus on Critical Legal Theory. Reviews the most important developments in critical theory as they relate to law and jurisprudence, beginning with a brief review of the modern critical tradition including writers such as Michel Foucault. Influence of this critical tradition in American legal theory, tracing the turn from Critical Legal Studies to the emergence of identity based critical movements such as Critical Race Theory, Critical Feminist Theory, and Critical Approaches to Sexual Orientation. Role that law plays in constructing and disciplining various forms of identity. Analysis of the contrast between critique as a mode of discourse and liberal and conservative analytical frameworks; discussion questions and criticisms raised about various forms of critical theory; and examination of the multiplicity of modes through which law constitutes identity rights. Graded pass/fail.

  • LAWE647 Cultural Property: Archaeology, Ethics, and Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Who owns the past? This course explores current issues of archaeological ethics and cultural heritage management. Topics range from the ancient history of looting and appropriation to the illicit antiquities market and site preservation today, and how local and international property and tax laws affect collecting practices. Students will prepare class presentations and research papers to explore these legal and ethical issues through specific case studies, primarily from the Mediterranean region.

  • LAWE745 D.C. Externship

    Semester hours: 13

    Units:

    Description

    Supervised externship (field placement) in a federal agency or nonprofit organization in Washington, DC and weekly seminar. Students must (1) work an average of 35 hours per week for 15 weeks at their field placement (500 hours total), (2) attend and actively participate in all weekly seminars, (3) complete the readings in the syllabus, and (4) complete all the written assignments described in the syllabus. Previous externship placements include the Federal Communications Commission, the Justice Department, the Department of Energy, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Department of Education Office of Civil Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Federal Labor Relations Authority, the DC Office of the Attorney General, and the National Network to End Domestic Violence. Graded pass/fail.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE699-DD Diversity in Education and Employment

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

    Description

    Special Topic. Legal and policy issues concerning race, gender, socioeconomic, and other types of diversity. Topics include Equal Protection law, affirmative action, employment discrimination law, the potential benefits of diversity, and problems that arise in diverse institutions and organizations.

  • LAWE785 Domestic Violence Seminar

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Explores the dynamics of domestic violence, its impact on families, and how our justice system responds to protect and punish those involved. Topics surveyed include mandatory arrest policies, victimless prosecutions, civil protective orders, and community-based services for domestic violence offenders.

  • LAWE626 Election Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Seminar that will examine laws regulating the political process. Topics will include voting rights, reapportionment, the role of political parties and campaign finance.

  • LAWE628 Employment Discrimination Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Study of federal laws prohibiting workplace discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, and disability. The primary focus of the course will be on the theories of discrimination that have evolved under the various antidiscrimination laws. Also focuses on specific issues relating to particular types of discrimination such as sexual harassment, sexual orientation discrimination, retaliation and reasonable accommodation of religion and disability. Analyzes the policy underlying the laws and whether the laws are effectively achieving the statutory goal of eliminating workplace discrimination. Discusses the effective use of the federal rules of civil procedure in employment litigation. The grade will be based on a final examination and class participation.

  • LAWE629 Employment Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Analysis of statutory and common law regulation of the employment relationship, including employer testing and information gathering, wage and hour regulation, OSHA, workers compensation, wrongful discharge and other common law actions challenging discharge, unemployment compensation, and ERISA. Consideration of what role the law should play in various aspects of the employment relationship.

  • LAWE666 Energy Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Focus on the laws and policies that govern the exploitation of energy resources and the production and distribution of electricity. Includes an introduction to the structure of energy law, and in particular its unique hybrid of three types of laws: (1) natural resources laws (laws regulating individual energy resources such as coal and oil); (2) public utility laws; and (3) environmental laws. Also focuses on the laws and policies that affect resources most important to the Mid-Atlantic region, particularly the laws governing coal, natural gas, and electricity. Further study of electricity restructuring (deregulation) and the ongoing Virginia and federal experience with it (including innovative use of market mechanisms) and global climate change and its relationship to energy industries. Course Requirements: Class discussion, possible in-class simulations and exercises, and either a final paper or a final examination at the end of the semester.

  • LAWE700 Entertainment Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Issues of law and policy affecting the entertainment industry.

  • LAWE620 Environmental Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Explores how lawyers can contribute to environmental protection through litigation, regulation, and policy advocacy. From Supreme Court decisions to local issues such as water pollution in the James River, examines the interaction of Congress, federal agencies, the states, and the courts in making and enforcing environmental law. Explores the professional roles of environmental lawyers and the perspectives of your potential future clients (environmental groups, government agencies, and businesses). Course coverage includes U.S. climate change policy, the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Superfund statute. Course may include guest speakers and/or field trip.

  • LAWE634 Estate Planning

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Examines a variety of estate planning topics, with an emphasis on those estate planning techniques that are most frequently used in practice today including drafting wills, drafting various types of trust agreements, basic provisions that go into most trusts, basic revocable trusts, complicated irrevocable trust instruments meant to control distributions, balance the provisioning of surviving spouses and other family members, and eliminate estate tax through the use of marital and charitable deductions. Explore other documents, such as power of attorney and medical directives, that form part of a comprehensive estate plan.

  • LAWE633 Estate and Gift Taxation

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    The nature of the estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer taxes and deal with issues that arise in connection with these taxes, such as valuing assets, calculating the tax, determining when a gift is made, qualifying for the gift tax annual exclusion, and determining which assets are included in the decedent's gross estate. Emphasis will be on general concepts and not on technical details. A previous course in federal income tax is suggested but not required.

  • LAWE599 Evidence

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    An introduction to the Federal Rules of Evidence. Concepts addressed include relevance, categorical rules of exclusion, character evidence, competency and credibility of witnesses, hearsay and its exceptions, privileges, authentication, and scientific evidence. May also address judicial notice and civil and criminal presumptions.

  • LAWE657 Expert Evidence

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Technical and legal aspects of scientific aids in the trial of civil and criminal cases. Scientific experts participate as guest lecturers.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 599

  • LAWE778 Family Law Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Working under the supervision of the clinic director, students will represent low-income clients in the City of Richmond on family law-related matters in a multi-disciplinary collaboration with faculty-supervised graduate students from Virginia Commonwealth University's School of Social Work and Department of Psychology.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE702 Family Law Procedure

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Specialized course in Virginia family law procedure concentrates on actual practice in the Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Courts of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Equips the JDR practitioner with the particular procedural aspects of jurisdiction, venue, parties, and appeals in criminal, child support, delinquency, abuse and neglect/foster care and custody cases. Taught by lecture, discussion and practical exercises.

  • LAWE707 Family Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Examines the legal rules governing family relationships and the policies and principles underlying them. Focuses on the following topics: who can marry; the rights, duties, and obligations of marriage; the state's interest in marriage; the dissolution of marriage; property distribution upon dissolution; the arrangements between divorced parents regarding the custody, support and visitation of children; and various jurisdictional issues relating to marriage, divorce, and custody. A central inquiry of the course will explore what a "family" is, and how the definition of "family" varies according to context, reflecting social values and policy goals. Also pays special attention to policy-based and theoretical questions about families, including how race, gender, and class affect the law's regulation of families, as well as the regulation of nontraditional families. Course materials will cut across multiple legal disciplines, such as constitutional law, criminal law, and contracts.

  • LAWE725 Family Privacy and the Law

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Upper Level Writing Requirement.

    Description

    Study of the interrelationship of legal rules, politics, ideology, and socio-economic realities that shape the relationships between individuals and/or families and the state, and among family members. Will consider a wide spectrum of topics, including parental privacy rights, children's privacy rights and right to a family, the right to marry, state regulation of sexual intimacy, and reproductive rights/justice.

  • LAWE636 Federal Courts

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Brings together federal civil procedure and federal constitutional law concepts and builds upon them. Deals with the relationship between the federal courts and other institutions of government, particularly Congress, the President, administrative agencies and the states. Includes the study of judicial review, judicial independence, jurisdiction, sovereign immunity, and habeas corpus actions, among several other topics. This class is particularly appropriate for students interested in clerking for a judge, or for students who anticipate a career litigating in federal court.

  • LAWE600 Federal Income Taxation

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Introduces students to the principles and policies of federal income taxation. Provides a framework for recognizing and dealing with tax issues and with tax-related strategies or transactions encountered in other legal practice specialties, including a basic understanding of the major theoretical and structural issues posed by an income tax, and the policy considerations involved in resolving those issues; a basic knowledge of the individual income tax treatment of various types of business and personal transactions and events (including taxation of compensation and fringe benefits, the taxation of various types of investment vehicles, debt-financed property transactions, installment sales, issues related to capitalization and cost recovery, timing issues, and selected issues regarding taxation of the family); the skills necessary to apply a complex statute; an understanding of the planning function provided by tax lawyers; the technical grounding necessary for further tax study or research.

  • LAWE699-FF Feminist Perspectives on Law

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Readings in feminist theory, queer theory, and other critical theory in order to examine constructions of gender and the roles legal systems play in those constructions. Explores some of the general themes and debates that have emerged as feminists attempt to understand and critique law¿s explicit and implicit constructions of gender as they relate to various groups and individuals. Discuss specific applications of theory to law and social policy, including topics related to identity performance and constraints on agency, the regulation of sexuality, the race of gender and the gender of race, intimate and familial relationships, work and wealth distribution, and various forms of violence.

  • LAWE678 Financial Institutions Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Law governing banking institutions and their holding companies and affiliates, including the governmental oversight and regulation of such entities. Overview of nonbank financial institutions such as insurance companies, securities broker dealers and investment companies. Reviews primary federal consumer protection statues and regulations including equal credit opportunity, truth in lending, credit reporting and community reinvestment. Summary of structured finance transactions, securitizations, and derivative transactions.

  • LAWE676 First Amendment Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Examines American constitutional law pertaining to religion, speech, and the media, including the law pertaining to aid for sectarian schools, prayer in public schools, conscientious objection, censorship, association, and access to trials and state secrets.

  • LAWE699-HH Future of Legal Practice Practicum
  • LAWE699-P Future of Legal Practice Practicum
  • LAWE699-TT Health Care Law Practicum

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Addresses the legal, regulatory, compliance, and business considerations that arise in the course of forming and operating a health care enterprise. Students perform multiple drafting assignments to gain insight into the issues regularly faced by health care attorneys, as well as the legal skills necessary to address those issues.

  • LAWE680 Health Law

    Semester hours: 2-4

    Units:

    Description

    Focuses on the federal and state laws and regulations applicable to the health care industry, with a particular focus on the regulation of health care providers. Topics covered include: laws regulating referral relationships between health care providers (e.g., the federal anti-kickback statute, the federal Ethics in Patient Referrals Act and the Virginia Practitioner Self-Referral Act); the federal False Claims Act and the false claims provisions of the Social Security Act; application of the antitrust laws to health care providers; licensure of health care providers; state certificate of need laws; and the impacts of the Affordable Care Act and recent Medicaid expansion in Virginia.

  • LAWE699-SS Health Reform in America

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Study of issues in the American health care system, particularly those impacting cost, quality, and access, and to explore alternative systems. Includes traditional classroom discussion, substantial community-based-learning component comprised of guest lectures, field trips, and case studies from foreign health care systems. Drafting proposed legislation and white paper in support of policy proposals. During most weeks this class will only meet for 100 minutes, however the class is scheduled for a longer block to allow time for occasional off-campus field trips.

  • LAWE760 Housing Law

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Explore the law and policy of housing. Considers the housing market in the United States, both for renters and for homeowners. Topics may include housing affordability, inclusionary/exclusionary zoning, the subprime mortgage crisis, government programs, and housing discrimination.

  • LAWE763 Housing Law Practicum

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Experiential course available to a limited number of students enrolled in housing law course. Application of the legal principles in housing law. Minimum of 30 hours of client work assisting clients with housing matters. Placement with either Housing Opportunities Made Equal of Virginia (HOME) or the Virginia Poverty Law Center (VPLC) under the supervision of an experienced attorney to serve low-income residents who are experiencing housing problems.

  • LAWE667 Human Rights Seminar

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    A general introduction to international human rights. Issues covered include nature of concept of human rights; origin and development of the International Bill of Rights; thematic procedures available for protection of human rights in the United Nations; standards and methods for international fact finding on human rights; cultural relativity in human rights law; implementation of the International Covenants on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights in the United States; the Inter-American Human Rights Process; and the ability of the United States to impact human rights in Third-World countries

  • LAWE699-Z Identity, Culture, & the Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Explores foundational aspects of culture and identity as they relate to the study and practice of law. Examines the impact of culture and identity on the lawyer¿s professional formation and development. Prepares students to engage in culturally responsive lawyering. Critique legal institutions relative to the presence or absence of cultural bias, and explore how legal culture impacts public trust in the legal system. Final grade will be based on class participation, periodic written reflection assignments, and completion of an individual project.

  • LAWE758 Immigration Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Explores the statutory and policy aspects and underpinnings of immigration law, including immigrant and nonimmigrant classifications, admission and exclusion issues, immigration compliance and immigration reform.

  • LAWE781 Immigration Rights Practicum

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Hands-on experience in immigration law through a combination of doctrinal teaching and representation of actual clients in immigration court. Analysis of and response to an immigration consultation, effective representation of clients in removal proceedings, understanding issues at the intersection of federal immigration law and local law enforcement, and protection of the constitutional rights of immigrants. No third-year practice certificate is required.

  • LAWE699-I Impact Litigation

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Explores legal, ethical, and strategic issues related to using impact litigation to advance constitutional and societal change, particularly in the in areas of reproductive and gender rights, racial justice, LGBTQ rights, and sentencing/death penalty reform. Using these topics, the seminar will address: selecting and using test cases; identifying plaintiffs; ethical obligations to clients; coalition litigation; the role of government lawyers; the role of amicus briefs; standing and mootness; use of public advocacy and media; the effect of lawsuits on policymakers and public officials; and litigation to achieve legislative change.

  • LAWE796 Independent Study

    Semester hours: 1-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement if taken for 2 or 3 sem. hrs.

    Description

    Independent research on approved selected topics. Topic must be approved in writing prior to registration by the associate dean and by the instructor under whose supervision the research is conducted. Limit of three semester hours total for independent research projects.

  • LAWE640 Insurance Law

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Analysis and resolution of insurance coverage disputes, involving insurance of the person life and health insurance), property insurance (i.e. homeowners and commercial property insurance) and liability insurance (i.e. automobile insurance, and commercial general liability insurance). Analysis of the formation, operation, and termination of the insurance contract; the insurable interest requirement; insurers' limitation of risk; waiver and estoppel defenses; coverage and exclusion to coverage; insurers and insureds obligations when loss occurs; and government regulation and control of the insurance industry. Taught in both a lecture-discussion and Socratic mode, with a three-hour essay examination at the course conclusion.

  • LAWE710 Intellectual Property Drafting

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Will focus on developing and refining practical skills, including conducting intellectual property audits, filing domestic and Madrid Protocol applications with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, trademark examination rules and procedures, conducting opposition proceedings, copyright filings, franchising issues, developing and implementing trade secrets policies and programs for businesses, licensing, and ethics.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 641.

  • LAWE641 Intellectual Property Fundamentals

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Survey of intellectual property law, including copyright, trademark, patent and other subject matters. Serves as the foundation course for the specialist who wishes to pursue the Intellectual Property certificate, but also a good choice for the generalist who simply wants to learn the basics of intellectual property law.

  • LAWE655 Intellectual Property Law and Policy Seminar

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Examines the legal and public policy considerations regarding intellectual property protection in various fields and industries. In particular, explores whether intellectual property protection and enforcement is beneficial and necessary for the creation, development, and commercialization of different ideas, expressions, and other intangibles.

  • LAWE782 Intellectual Property Litigation Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Exposure to intellectual property litigation practice through simulation. Skills will include interviewing and counseling client; recognizing causes of action, potential counter-claims, and defenses; figuring out jurisdiction and venue issues; preparing discovery; and drafting pre-trial motions. Grading will be based on writing assignments and class participation in simulation exercises. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 641 Intellectual Property Fundamentals or LAWE 744 Patent Law or LAWE 768 Trademark & Unfair Competition Law

  • LAWE790 Intellectual Property and Transactional Law Clinic

    Semester hours: 6

    Units:

    Description

    Students represent for-profit and nonprofit organizations, as well as social entrepreneurs, artists, authors and inventors from a variety of backgrounds. Students will help business startup clients by engaging in business formation counseling. Students provide legal services to clients, including negotiating and drafting contracts, providing corporate legal services and analysis, and facilitating strategic decision-making. Students assist clients in the assessment and potential licensing of a variety of intellectual property rights. The classroom seminar will provide clinic students the opportunity to study and reflect on the theoretical framework and application of related substantive subjects.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE757 International Arbitration

    Semester hours: 1-6

    Units:

    Description

    Gives an introduction to the main characteristics of international arbitration. In the first part of the semester, we will examine the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration, and why parties may prefer arbitration. We will then look at the arbitration agreement, the process of arbitration, and the enforcement of arbitral awards. This course will review both commercial and investment arbitration and survey the main various arbitral tribunals and their rules, including ICSID, ICC, and ILCA. Examination.

  • LAWE756 International Business Practice

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    A hands-on opportunity to develop strategies for Virginia companies seeking to expand their businesses in foreign markets. Students meet with a Virginia business client to define the scope of their project, identify legal issues, research foreign and domestic laws, develop legal strategies, and then present their findings to the client¿s executives and senior management. Law students team with MBA students from a participating business school to prepare international business plans and then co-present their work to the client. The teams prepare and deliver comprehensive presentations of their strategies and the legal issues they have identified as the capstone to their work.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE642 International Business Transactions

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Problems in international trade and investment; regulation of international trade by national governments and international agencies. Emphasis on lawyer's role in counseling firms engaged in international activities.

  • LAWE738 International Courts and Tribunals

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Introduction to existing international courts and tribunals and their jurisdiction, including courts that have general jurisdiction to hear inter-state disputes (the International Court of Justice, the Permanent Court of Arbitration, ad hoc bodies) and courts and tribunals that have specialized subject-matter jurisdiction. Examines courts and tribunals competent to hear international criminal law, including the International Criminal Court, ICTY and ICTR. Analyzes regional courts and tribunals that hear cases related to human rights abuses. Also studies investment disputes (state/investor) and the principle available fori, including ICSID and NAFTA and ad hoc tribunals and claims commissions, such as the Iran-US tribunal, the UN Compensation Commission.

  • LAWE699-B International Criminal Justice & Transnational Justice

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Examines international criminal law, first substantially (what are subjects, sources, crimes) and then procedurally (including at the ICC, ICTY, ICTR). In the second part of the course, we will focus on certain post-conflict situations (e.g. Rwanda, Iraq, Afghanistan) and analyze issues of transitional justice and application of international criminal law there.

  • LAWE729 International Environmental Law

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Upper Level Writing Requirement

    Description

    Explores how the international community has managed and mismanaged global environmental problems since the watershed UN Conference on Environment and Development in 1992. Involves a mix of readings, discussions, and simulations in various fields of international environmental law, with a particular focus on climate change, biodiversity, and international regulation of toxic hazards. Cross-cutting themes include North/South disputes, the precautionary principle, liability as a compliance mechanism, and the involvement of non-state actors in creating and implementing international environmental law. The major assignment for the course will be a seminar research paper.

  • LAWE685 International Law Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Legal research and analysis on cutting-edge, contemporary international law issues. Provide advice as requested by international organizations such as the United Nations and the World Bank. At the end of the semester, may present the outcome of the research projects to requesting parties in Washington, DC and/or New York. Graded pass/fail.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 643 International Law

  • LAWE643 International Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Basic principles, including sources of international law, settlement of international disputes, responsibilities and immunities of sovereign states, human rights, and the machinery of international law and justice.

  • LAWE670 Interviewing and Counseling

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    In-depth analysis of pretrial lawyering skills using interdisciplinary materials. Explores interpersonal relationships, focusing on role of attorney in relation to client, the legal system (including other attorneys), and society. Classroom discussion and development of own skills through weekly audio- and video-taped simulations. Enrollment limited.

  • LAWE671 Interviewing, Negotiating, and Counseling

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Analysis of the relationships between attorney and client, attorney and witness, and attorney and opposing counsel. Examine and practice interviewing skills and explore the role of the attorney as counselor. Theories of decision-making in the lawyer/client relationship and identifying client values. Negotiation theory and techniques for conducting a successful negotiation. Observe and practice interviewing, counseling, and negotiation.

  • LAWE653 Introduction to Businesss

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Introduces students to basic business principles and then reinforces this knowledge through application to actual business settings. There are two parts to the course. Part I will be a series of online modules on the business disciplines of Accounting, Finance and Management, where student learning will be evaluated through online assessments. Part II will be five in-person class meetings during the week before the Spring semester, where each day will cover a different business case involving actual firms and the business disciplines of Accounting, Finance and Management. Student learning will be evaluated through a short write-up for each case, verbal participation during class, and a take-home project based on a comprehensive business case. After completing the course, students will have a greater ability to apply their business knowledge in actual business settings.

  • LAWE590 Jurisprudence

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Provides an introduction to the field of jurisprudence, the academic discipline devoted to answering the fundamental question: What is law? We will explore the many ways that scholars have attempted to define law and legal systems against a series of related concepts, including morality, authority, power, politics, planning, rationality, coercion, obedience, and violence. Through a series of short written assignments, we will critique the prevailing theories and attempt to construct the elements for an original definition of law.

  • LAWE699-NN Juvenile Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Explores the statutory, caselaw, and policy aspects and underpinnings of juvenile delinquency law. Designed to help the student develop a thorough understanding of the evolution of juvenile law, adolescent development, and the many special issues involved in the representation of child clients. Class will be taught through a combination of lecture, demonstration, small group discussions of hypothetical situations, simulation, and guest lectures. Topics will include the vulnerability of young people to falsely confess, the ways children are treated in the court system, trauma-informed responses to juvenile delinquency, ethical considerations, the challenges presented by clients with mental health issues, and specialized interviewing techniques.

  • LAWE742 Key Decisions of International Courts

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Study and assessment of the most significant decisions of international courts, including the International Court of Justice, the principal judicial organ of the United Nations and the primus inter pares of international dispute resolution forums.

  • LAWE644 Labor Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Analysis of origin and scope of National Labor Relations Act and role of the National Labor Relations Board and the courts in interpreting the statute. Focus on right of employees to organize unions, choice of bargaining representative, strikes and picketing, and negotiation and enforcement of collective bargaining agreement.

  • LAWE645 Land Use Planning

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Government control of use of land and eminent domain. Zoning, subdivision control, and urban redevelopment and planning.

  • LAWE659 Law and Economics

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Application of economic analysis to legal concepts. Using goals of efficiency and wealth maximization, shows how economic theory can unify property law, contract law, tort law, criminal law, and family/sex law, as well as offer new insights to old problems.

  • LAWE638 Law and Literature

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Explores the themes rule of law v. equity; law, justice, and morality; the role of narrative; and the role of the lawyer in counseling and advocating for a client by reading literary texts (that may include classic texts, modern texts, graphic novels, etc.) and viewing some films/film excerpts. Variety of genres furthers the exploration of effective communication techniques and the role of narrative in different forms. Classroom discussions are designed to explore justice and the law through fictional stories, challenging students to reflect upon their role as lawyers in our legal system.

  • LAWE699-OO Law of Arbitration

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement.

    Description

    Special Topic. Explores the federal law and Supreme Court precedent that have increasingly privatized litigation. Analysis of how arbitration is structured, is regulated, and interacts with constitutional norms and federal and state regulatory regimes. Meets upper-level writing requirement.

  • LAWE681 Law of Armed Conflict

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Examination of international law relating to the use of force. Areas of study include situations of self-defense and authorization to use force by the United Nations Security Council. Peacekeeping missions will be considered, as will situations of collective self-defense and the theory of "humanitarian intervention." Also considers international humanitarian law: customary and treaty-based restrictions on the use of force such as the requirement to avoid targeting civilians, the requirement of proportionality, and prohibitions on the use of certain weapons. Draws on current events and focus on real-world applications of international law.

  • LAWE693 Law of the European Union

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    (Offered only in Cambridge Summer Program). Surveys institutions of the EU and examines substantive principles of EU law and their integration into the legal systems of member countries.

  • LAWE592 Legal History Seminar
  • LAWE699-AA Legal History
  • LAWE699-WW Legal Project Management
  • LAWE652 Local Government Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Focuses on legal issues in local government law with a practical approach. Covers a variety of topics that are relevant to local government law, except for education law and environmental law. Thorough research skills and the ability to identify and analyze legal issues are critical requirements in this course.

  • LAWE779 London Clinical Placement Program

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Description

    Placements are available with law firms/chambers; government related agencies and organizations, such as the House of Commons and Crown Prosecution Services; law societies; citizens' advice bureaus; royal courts; property management and development firms, financial institutions; and the legal departments of media and entertainment firms. Two-hour weekly classroom component required. Graded pass/fail. See director of Clinical Placement Program for more details.

  • LAWE699-O Media and Privacy Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. An introduction to the rights and responsibilities of the mass media with respect to newsgathering, publication, and the privacy rights of individuals. This course involves substantial coverage of the First Amendment as well as common law torts such as defamation, infliction of emotional distress, and appropriation of an individual's likeness or image. Cases will be drawn from print, broadcast, internet, and social media, and we will also cover privacy in data and records. Assignments include short exercises and a final exam.

  • LAWE699-VV Mediation

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Mediation from the perspectives of both the advocate and the mediator, giving participants insight into the mediation process and reasons for the elements of the process. Selection and evaluation of the mediation alternatives and potential mediators for a better case fit, increasing the likelihood of a successful mediation. Highly experiential.

  • LAWE762 Medical Malpractice

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Liability of physician for injuries arising out of the physician patient relationship. Includes coverage of standard of care, causation, informed consent, intentional torts, and recoverable damages.

  • LAWE705 Mergers and Acquisitions

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Focuses on the law governing corporate mergers, acquisitions, recapitalizations, and proxy contests. Discussion will include transaction structure, purchase agreements, stockholder litigation, and relevant state and federal laws, with a primary focus on fiduciary duties in the context of buying and selling a business.

    Prerequisites

    Business Associations (602)

  • LAWE649 Mindfulness and the Legal Profession
  • LAWE699-PP Moot Court Competition

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Students in this class are selected by the instructor to prepare for and participate in an interscholastic moot court competition. Graded pass/fail.

  • LAWE735 National Security Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Offers an analysis of the interplay of law and national security. It will include coverage of such issues as: terrorism offenses, espionage, collection of evidence in international cases, interrogation techniques, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, protection and use of classified evidence in federal court, the right to counsel and national security defendants, military detention, and trials of cases involving national security.

  • LAWE672 Negotiation

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction to the theory and practice of negotiations. Game theory, economic model bargaining, social-psychological theories and the problem-solving negotiation theory are each studied. Explores the different negotiation styles, techniques of preparation and information gathering, persuasion and the process of exchange in bargaining. Both dispute resolution and transactional negotiations are reviewed.

  • LAWE771 Nonprofit Organizations

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Examines the nature, formation, governance and operation of nonprofit organizations. Topics include the law governing nonprofits; the skills necessary to create, operate, and advocate for nonprofit organizations; determining the legal form of the organization; tax exempt status; fundraising (charitable giving, solicitations, legal regulation of such activities); duties and responsibilities of the board of directors; liability of nonprofit organizations; and ethical issues for nonprofits. The class is designed for both law students and business students. Guest speakers from area nonprofits will supplement the readings and discussion. Readings will include case studies, as well as cases and articles from legal and business sources. A field trip to a nonprofit organization may be taken. Class project involves a case study of a nonprofit, advising the nonprofit organization on legal and business issues and where appropriate, assisting the nonprofit in organizing, establishing organizational and operational documents, filing for tax exempt status, and/or creating operational policies. The final grade will be based on class participation, written responses to case studies, and the students' work on the class projects.

  • LAWE744 Patent Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Covers fundamental doctrines of patent law and is designed to serve as a basic course for those who wish to specialize in this field, as well as to provide a general background for a corporate or business practice. Topics will include eligible subject matter for patenting; conditions for patentability, including utility, novelty, non-obviousness, enablement, best mode, definiteness, and adequate written description; patent infringement; defenses; and remedies. Will study statutory aspects of patent law, as well as judicial interpretation by the Supreme Court and the Federal Circuit Court. Further, course will consider justifications for the patent monopoly. An engineering or science background is not required to take the course.

  • LAWE718 Poverty Law Practicum

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Explores the legal and policy responses to poverty in the United States and addresses how the law shapes the lives of poor people and communities. Special focus upon the Greater Richmond area, examining the extent of poverty, the root causes, and the historical development of social welfare policy. Focuses on the rights-based aspect of poverty law and various policies that attempt to ameliorate poverty.

  • LAWE699-V Practice Design and Innovation

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Uses the discipline of business design as applied to the unique characteristics of the legal profession itself and the markets it serves, to generate new service ideas and models.

  • LAWE601 Pre-Trial Litigation Skills

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Enhances understanding of critical pretrial tools and provides practical experience with using these tools. Course requires drafting a variety of pretrial documents that are frequently used in litigation, such as a complaint, and a pretrial motion. Also provides practice of such skills as interviewing clients and negotiating settlements. Focuses on the correct use of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure but relevant in state court litigation as well.

  • LAWE654 Products Liability Law

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Analyzes the affirmative cause of action for personal injuries caused by defective products, applicable defenses, and other relevant theoretical, policy and practical issues. Emphasis is on strict liability in tort under Section 402A of the Restatement of Torts and national developments; however, relevant Virginia developments will be assessed.

  • LAWE734 Professional Responsibility: Criminal Practice

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Reviews some of the major ethical considerations that confront prosecutors and criminal defense attorneys, including ethical considerations surrounding the discovery process, ethical pleading principles, joint defense agreements, inadvertent disclosures, resolving disputes with clients regarding trial tactics, communicating with clients effectively, and setting and collecting fees. Students will examine these and similar questions by studying case opinions, selected secondary materials, and applicable ABA Model Rules of Professional responsibility, and by participating in weekly discussion.

  • LAWE724 Professional Responsibility: Family Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Delineates the ethical responsibilities of lawyers in family law cases. Issues related to the lawyer-client relationships: communication and confidentiality; conflicts of interests; controlling the case; ethical tactics; ethical negotiations; mediation; and other ethical duties of the family law practitioner are surveyed. Designed to encourage the study and elevate the standards of those who practice family law. There will be case studies and examples of issues that are presented to the practicing family lawyer on a day-to-day basis. The course will combine theory and practice as it relates to helping to guide the practicing lawyer through the maze of ethical issues that are constantly arising in the family law practice. This course is required for those students seeking the Certificate of Concentration in Family Law.

    Prerequisites

    Family Law (707).

  • LAWE714 Professional Responsibility: Role of the Prosecutor

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Examines how and why the prosecutor has become the most influential actor in today's criminal justice process. Debates the normative consequences of that development. Discusses a variety of topics of contemporary significance, including the scope of prosecutorial power, past and current attempts to constrain prosecutorial power, and how prosecutorial power shapes the criminal justice system as a whole. Examines the relationships between prosecutors and other institutions, such as legislatures, courts, defense attorneys, victims, and the public. The course will also include substantial instruction on the rules of professional conduct as they apply to prosecutors. Assessment based on participation in class and a series of short papers.

  • LAWE639 Public Policy Research and Drafting

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Combines both advanced legal research and writing instruction with a client-based experience. Provides students with an opportunity to explore advanced legal research in the public policy field, develop their writing skills in the context of creating an issue paper, and engage in client relations with nonprofit organizations from the greater Richmond community.

  • LAWE765 Race, Religion and the Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Focuses on the intersection of race and religion, and their impact on the law as expressed in American judicial decisions. To facilitate this inquiry, the course furnishes historical background regarding the evolution of the concept of race in western societies, especially Europe and the United States. Also addresses how religious traditions, notably Christianity, have impacted the understanding of race.

  • LAWE611 Real Estate Transfers and Finance

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Surveys modern real estate transactions, such as condominiums, cooperatives, sales and leasebacks, leasehold mortgages, FHA and VA financing, tax consequences, title insurance, construction loan agreements, and shopping center leases.

  • LAWE660 Regulatory Law Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Practice-oriented exposure to regulatory law and to legal careers working within and against government agencies. Assignments include client counseling, negotiating against the government, multi-stakeholder policy planning, writing and enforcing regulations, complaint drafting, and litigation settlement. Interactive class sessions will be devoted to problems drawn from environmental law, health, financial reform, and other areas. Grading will be based on writing assignments and in-class presentations. There is no final exam. Meets Writing in Practice requirement.

  • LAWE656 Remedies

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Putting legal theory into the practical context of its ultimate remedy for the client, covers primarily equitable remedies Covers the equitable remedies of bills of peace, receiverships, injunctions to enforce contracts, injunctions to prevent torts, constructive trusts to prevent unjust enrichment, restitution, equitable defenses, contempt of court, etc and a broad range of general legal topics, including the remedies available for breach of contract, commission of torts, waste and nuisance to property, civil procedure (injunctions and contempt of court), etc. Looks at the broad areas of the law from the point of view of the remedy available to the litigant. Method of Assessment: The students argue each of the cases, and then there is class discussion. At the end of the course, each student will be required to write a 1,000 word essay on some topic of equity, and there will also be an examination.

  • LAWE780 Research Assistant

    Semester hours: 1-4

    Units:

    Description

    Students may assist professors on the full-time faculty in their scholarly research efforts, either for pay (under the University Work Study Program), or for academic credit, though not for both at the same time. Students may earn up to four hours of academic credit toward their degree requirements by serving as unpaid research assistants. The credit hours may be pass/fail or graded, at the option of the student, and with the permission of the professor. Graded credit hours require a written work product by the student that will enable the professor to determine an appropriate grade. To receive academic credit, the student must work an average of four hours per week throughout the semester, for each hour of academic credit earned. Registration is with permission of the professor and the dean's office. Limit of four semester hours total. Available pass/fail grading only.

  • LAWE743 Restorative Justice

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement (written paper option)

    Description

    Methods for responding to conflict or crime in a collaborative manner that prioritizes healing, prevention, and community-based reconciliation. Considers the theory of restorative justice and explore restorative practices in various U.S. contexts including criminal justice (adult and juvenile), educational institutions, and community-based reconciliation in the wake of systematic injustice. Explores the emergent conception of "restorative lawyering" and inquires into the potential role of restorative principles throughout the practice of law. Meets upper-level writing requirement.

  • LAWE706 Role of Lawyer in Mediation

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Covers the role of the lawyer in mediation. Designed to provide students with skills necessary to effectively represent their client in the mediation process. Will explore differences between interest-based and positional negotiation. Stages of the mediation process and the role of the mediator will be reviewed. Additional areas that will be addressed include the attorney's ethical obligation to inform clients about dispute resolution options, factors that should be considered in assessing whether a case is appropriate for mediation, preparing for mediation, collaborative problem-solving, and effective strategies in representing clients in the mediation process. Students will engage in a series of mock mediations to develop their advocacy skills and will be introduced to various applications of mediation by the courts, state agencies and private entities.

  • CLAC605 Russian: Cultures and Language Across the Curriculum

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic Russian materials relevant to materials in the primary course. Pass/fail grade only.

  • LAWE675 Sales and Leases

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Articles 2 (Sales) and 2A (Leases) of the Uniform Commercial Code, including the structure and methodology of the Uniform Commercial Code, as it is reflected in Articles 2 and 2A, and the Code's relationship to, similarities with, and differences from the general law of contract, property and tort.

  • LAWE677 Secured Transactions

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    An introduction to the law governing contractually created interests in personal property used to secure payment or performance of obligations. Study of the creation, perfection, priority and enforcement of security interests in personal property under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Also includes an examination of relevant provisions of the Bankruptcy Code and some other state and federal statutes that affect security interests.

  • LAWE658 Securities Regulation

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Discussion of the theory of disclosure, examination of information that is important to investors ("material" in securities lingo), and investments that fall within the definition of a "security" under federal law. Considers, mandatory disclosure by public companies; antifraud statutes (some of which apply only to public companies and some to both public and private companies); Rule 10b-5 (complete with some insider trading law); the law governing public offerings of securities; the exemptions that permit a company to sell securities outside the elaborate registration process that governs public offerings; and the rules governing re-sales. Focuses exclusively on federal law and its variety (statutes, rules and regulations, court rulings, SEC staff bulletins, no action letters, comment letters, etc.). Also considers selected aspects of enforcement of the securities laws by the SEC, the federal criminal authorities, and private lawsuits.

    Prerequisites

    Business Associations (LAWE 602)

  • LAWE719 Selected Issues in Public International Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    (Offered only in Cambridge.) Consideration of various discrete issues of public international law, including statehood, boundaries, the law of war, jurisdiction and state responsibility, and their relation to municipal law.

  • LAWE615 Selected Topics in Virginia Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    A substantive overview of topics heavily tested on the Virginia Bar Exam.

    Prerequisites

    This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE728 Sentencing Law

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Upper Level Writing Requirement.

    Description

    Explores the theories of criminal punishment, the criminal sentencing process, and contemporary issues in sentencing. Topics include: the traditional justifications for criminal punishment--retribution, deterrence, incapacitation, and rehabilitation--and the shifting historical prominence of these justifications; the factors that influence punishment, such as the characteristics of the offense and the offender; the role of judicial, executive, and legislative branch actors in setting sentencing law and policy; and the implementation of the federal sentencing guidelines. Also explores systemic sentencing issues, such as racial disparities in the criminal justice system, and modern sentencing reform efforts.

  • LAWE740 Sexual Orientation and the Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Seminar examines legal rights of lesbians and gay men. Explores concept of sexual orientation and legal system's regulation of life experiences of lesbians and gay men, including sexuality, expressions of identity, public and private employment, same-sex relationships, and parenting.

  • LAWE699-M Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and the Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Examines laws regulating persons whose sexual orientation or gender identity does not conform to that of the majority. Considers these laws as applied various contexts, such as public and private employment, education, family relationships and places of public accommodation. Includes theoretical and empirical bases for the laws.

    Prerequisites

    Meets Upper-level Writing requirement.

  • LAWE730 Spanish Legal Skills
  • CLAC602 Spanish: Cultures and Language Across the Curriculum

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Students will be guided in their study and discussion of authentic Spanish materials relevant to materials in the primary course. Pass/fail grade only.

  • LAWE690 Sports and the Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    A survey course addressing legal issues presented by both professional and amateur sports in a variety of settings. Examines such issues as the legal concept of amateurism, the organization of amateur sports associations, and eligibility for participation as an amateur, especially in the context of intercollegiate athletics Also focuses on gender and disability discrimination issues, the organization of professional sports with the power of the commissioner and the organization of leagues. The application of antitrust law to amateur and professional sports will also be examined, along with issues presented by the representation of professional athletes and the enforcement of sports contracts. Criminal and tort liability issues presented by sports participation will also be discussed, along with workers compensation and drug testing issues.

  • LAWE684 Start-up Accelerator Practicum

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction to working with startup companies and entrepreneurs on issues of corporate governance and early-stage venture capital investments. Students will work with real companies at Lighthouse Labs, a start-up accelerator located in downtown Richmond. Students will work with the instructor to provide services like drafting operating agreements, term sheets, and documents relating to private equity investments. Also covers drafting and amending capitalization tables, calculating payments to owners and investors, and advising clients on the economic and practical implications of these transactions.

    Prerequisites

    LAWE 602

  • LAWE699-QQ State and Local Taxation

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Studies the economic, administrative, political, and constitutional constraints on state and local taxation ("SALT"). Does not concentrate on the laws of any particular state nor is any prior course in taxation required. Focuses on the various restraints imposed on the states' systems of taxation. Emphasis is on corporate income taxation and sales and use taxation, but some attention will be placed on individual income taxation.

  • LAWE699-N Tax Policy Reading Group

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Readings about and discussion of important tax policy issues. Meets five times over the term to explore topics, including taxes and pollution, taxes and the government deficit, and taxes and income inequality. Requires reflection papers. There is no final exam and the class is graded pass/fail.

  • LAWE674 Tax Policy Seminar

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Designed for students generally interested in public policy issues as well as for those specializing in tax. Focuses on the policies and structures of a well designed tax system; examines the goals, politics, and history of tax reform; and provides an overview of the central policy issues raised by income-based and consumption-based tax systems.

  • LAWE635 Taxation of Partnerships and LLCs

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Nature and formation of a partnership; taxation of partnership income; transactions between related parties; termination of partnership; sale of partnership interest; distribution by partnership; special basis adjustment; and distribution to retiring or deceased partners. Also includes treatment of pass-through entities.

    Prerequisites

    Federal Income Taxation (600).

  • LAWE699-D Technology Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Special Topic. Designed to prepare students for TechLaw careers. Considers the interplay of law, technological design, norms, and the market as modalities of regulation; competing strategies for updating the law through courts, legislatures, administrative agencies, and international institutions; efforts by incumbent and newcomer industries to use the law to promote their preferred business models; and the legal implications of other political, economic, and social impacts associated with legally disruptive technologies.

  • LAWE699-KK The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments: Ending Slavery, Building Liberty

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Special Topic. Explores the history and original understanding of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments. The aftermath of the Civil War witnessed the adoption of three revolutionary amendments that transformed the structure of American freedom. The Thirteenth Amendment eradicated slavery along with its badges and incidents. The Fourteenth Amendment established birthright citizenship and announced the nationalized protection of individual liberty. The Fifteenth Amendment guaranteed black males the vote, not only in the South but throughout the United States. Studies original historical documents relating to the adoption and early understanding of all three Amendments and requires a paper exploring an aspect of this critical period in our constitutional history. Meets upper-level writing requirement.

  • LAWE622 The Constitution & the State Attorney General

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Description

    Unique role and powers of State Attorneys General, with a focus on how the work of an Attorney General's office relates to both the federal and State constitutions. Issues will include the origins of the office of Attorney General; the function and interpretation of State constitutions (with primary reference to the Constitution of Virginia), especially in relation to the U.S. Constitution; how Attorneys General advance and defend the rights of State residents and the constitutionality of State laws through litigation; and the increasing influence of cooperative multi-State efforts led by Attorneys General and the nationwide injunctions that result. Case studies to illuminate these issues will be taken from areas of significant public interest, such as immigration, health care, gun rights, equality, and redistricting.

    Prerequisites

    LAWR 503 Constitutional Law

  • LAWE697 The Death Penalty

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction to one of the most controversial criminal justice issues of our time¿the death penalty. Historical examination of the forces that led to abolition of the death penalty in 1972 and reinstatement in 1976, ushering in the modern death penalty era. Survey of the most prominent issues associated with the death penalty, including its justifications, cost, constitutional regulation, execution methods, housing on death row, and claims of arbitrariness, disproportionate imposition on race and class grounds, inadequate capital defense, and potential for convicting the innocent. Considers the American death penalty from a global perspective to understand the movement toward worldwide abolition and why the United States is or is not a part of it.

  • LAWE695 The Happy Lawyer: Finding Your Path

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Explores the role that workplace attributes and personal characteristics play in the lives of lawyers. Class meetings will be held on Sunday evenings over dinner at the home of Dean Perdue. During each class session, students will discuss prepared readings relevant to the course topic, and interact with guest speakers who will share a real-world perspective on lawyering, career development, self-care practices, and the particular ways they have pursued happiness, purpose, and meaning in their work. Credit for the pass/fail course will be reflected on each student¿s spring semester transcript.

  • LAWE715 The Prosecution Project

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Policy clinic that is a unique collaboration between law students and professional prosecutors through a partnership with the Committee on Justice and Professionalism of the Virginia Association of Commonwealth¿s Attorneys (VACA). Through readings and discussions with experienced prosecutors, judges, police, defense attorneys and others, students are introduced to the professional roles of prosecutors, to their ethical responsibilities, and to the challenges faced by modern prosecutors in seeking to do justice in a rapidly changing environment. Through research and analysis, students assist the VACA Committee in its efforts to study and address issues of importance to prosecutors and the public.

  • LAWE768 Trademark Law

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Topics include acquisition of exclusive trademark rights; federal registration of marks; the territorial and subject-matter scope of protection; the ways in which trademark rights are violated; the interaction of trademark law and the First Amendment; and related fields of unfair competition law, including cybersquatting, false advertising, and the right of publicity. Explores trademark law¿s rationales and the role of various constituencies in the shaping of trademark doctrines.

  • LAWE793 Trial Competition

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    tudents in this class are selected by the instructors to prepare for and participate in an interscholastic trial competition. Graded pass/fail.

    Prerequisites

    Departmental approval. LAWE 699 Criminal Trial Practice

  • LAWE699-C ULWR: Public Law Topics

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement.

    Description

    Special Topic. Designed for students who wish to satisfy their Upper Level Writing Requirement by writing about a topic in the field of public law. Public law topics are, generally speaking, those affected by constitutional provisions, statutes, or regulations. General instruction in the field of public law; primarily designed to provide students with a way to pursue individual writing projects under faculty supervision.

  • LAWE722 Veteran's Law

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    Introduction to the administrative law of veterans benefits. Focus on the public policy behind veterans benefits, the practical aspects of filing disability compensation claims with the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, and appealing the denials of such claims. Analysis of current legislative efforts to reform the veterans benefits system.

  • LAWE699-A Vices - Prohibition, Regulation, and Social Impact

    Semester hours: 4

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets the upper level writing requirement.

    Description

    Special Topic. Examines the historical treatment of and trends in public policy regarding gambling, pornography, prostitution, alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drugs. We will consider the effectiveness of these policies on human behavior and related industry, including the impact of legal and illicit markets on society, race and gender

  • LAWE662 Virginia Legal Research
  • LAWE664 Virginia Procedure

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Specialized course in Virginia civil procedure which covers the subject of procedure from the point of view of practice in the Virginia state courts. Covers every aspect of procedure from self-help, subject matter jurisdiction, active jurisdiction, service of process, venue, parties, pleading, discovery, pre-trial motions, motions at trial, post-verdict motions, judgments, costs, and appeals Taught by lecture and discussion.

  • LAWE683 Voting Rights

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    Study of contemporary American voting rights law. Traces the history of voting rights law in the United States, considers how the passage of various Amendments to the United States Constitution and the passage and reauthorizations of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 have affected how voting rights are defined and provided by states, analyzes how those laws have affected how states distribute political power through redistricting, and studies how the development of voting rights law will likely affect the future of voting rights in America.

  • LAWE661 WTO Dispute Resolution

    Semester hours: 1

    Units:

    Description

    Framework for understanding the WTO dispute settlement system. Examines the formation of the WTO, the types of obligations undertaken through the relevant agreements, and the role played by the dispute settlement system. Detailed look at the Dispute Settlement Understanding ("DSU"), the agreement governing WTO dispute settlement. Assessment of the system¿s strengths and weaknesses.

  • LAWE687 White Collar Crime

    Semester hours: 3

    Units:

    Description

    Study of what are generally considered to be business or organizational crimes. Topics to be explored may include: mail and wire fraud, conspiracy, public corruption, perjury (including false statements and false claims liability), money laundering, federal sentencing guidelines, the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, grand jury practice and internal investigations.

  • LAWE606 Wills and Trusts

    Semester hours: 3-4

    Units:

    Description

    Considers the transmission of property when an owner dies: laws of intestate distribution that are applied where there is no will; the use of wills , including rules of execution, change and interpretation; and the intention and use of trusts, with emphasis on the role of trusts in estate planning.

  • LAWE711 Workers Compensation

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    A practical survey of workers' compensation in Virginia. Focuses on providing a substantive overview of the law, combined with projects geared toward teaching students to handle actual workers' compensation cases, from the investigation and filing of a claim through hearing and appeal.

  • LAWE699-S Writing for Clerks

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets Writing in Practice requirement

    Description

    Special Topic. For students with an interest in clerking for a state or federal judge, or with an interest in further developing legal writing skills. Instruction will focus on writing bench memos and opinions, as well as other skills specific to the task of clerking (such as managing case flow, monitoring dockets, etc).

  • LAWE774 Wrongful Conviction Clinic

    Semester hours: 2

    Units:

    Description

    With supervision from the director of the Institute of Actual Innocence, students will screen, investigate and, when possible, help prepare cases for post-conviction litigation under Virginia's Writs of Actual Innocence. Litigation work is only possible when a case has matured to that level. Students will work in teams. The cases selected for investigation and litigation are those where there is substantial evidence of innocence. Prerequisite: First priority for enrollment goes to students who have completed the Wrongful Conviction Seminar (770). Students who have not completed the seminar must obtain approval to enroll in the clinic.

    Prerequisites

    First priority for enrollment goes to students who have completed the Wrongful Conviction Seminar (770). Students who have not completed the seminar must obtain approval to enroll in the clinic. This course requires special approval for registration; contact the professor for details.

  • LAWE770 Wrongful Conviction Seminar

    Semester hours: 2-3

    Units:

    Fulfills General Education Requirement Meets upper-level writing requirement

    Description

    A topical introductory course addressing the causes of wrongful convictions. The readings are multi-disciplinary and heavily drawn from law review articles. Class participation is an important piece. The class has several guest speakers who address public policy issues in the area of wrongful convictions. Those who take this course have priority for the spring clinic, but students not planning on the clinic are also encouraged to enroll. There is no final exam.